Wilderness Library

Common Octopus

Common Octopus

Octopuses have long arms with many suckers on each arm. This octopus uses its suckers to move and to grab animals when it is hunting. By Albert Kok Image Source Octopuses live in the oceans. They have no bones in their bodies, and every part of an octopus is soft except for its hard, beak-shaped Read More

Coral Snake

Coral Snake

Coral snakes have red, yellow, and black bands on their long narrow bodies. By LA Dawson Image Source Coral snakes have hollow teeth called fangs that they use to inject poison into their victims. Their bright red, yellow, and black stripes warn other animals that coral snakes are poisonous. People don’t see coral snakes very Read More

Crossbill

Crossbill

Female Crossbill U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Dave Menke Image Source The crossbills are birds in the finch family Fringillidae. These birds are called crossbills because their beaks cross at their tips. Adult males tend to be red or orange in color, and females green or yellow, but there is much variation. These are specialist Read More

Double-crested Cormorant

Double-crested Cormorant

Donna A. Dewhurst , U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Image Source The Double-crested Cormorant is a large black seabird. It has a long tail and a long neck with a bit of yellow under its throat. It is called the Double-crested Cormorant because it has two white streaks on its head during the breeding season. Read More

Downy Woodpecker

Downy Woodpecker

A Downy Woodpecker is pecking on a tree branch, digging for insects. David Brezinski U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Image Source Did you know that the Downy Woodpecker is the smallest woodpecker in North America? At 6.75 inches in length, the Downy Woodpecker is the smallest woodpecker in North America. What does the Downy Woodpecker Read More

Eastern Box Turtle

Eastern Box Turtle

This box turtle was photographed in North Carolina, where the box turtle is recognized as the official state reptile. By Ken Thomas Image Source Eastern Box Turtles are members of the reptile family. Like all reptiles, turtles hatch from eggs, and a turtle’s internal body temperature is easily affected by the air or water around Read More

Eastern Hognose Snake

Eastern Hognose Snake

This young hognose snake is only six inches long! By Benny Mazur Image Source The Eastern Hognose Snake is a nonpoisonous snake that lives in woods and grasslands in eastern North America. Hognoses like open areas and sandy soil that is easy to dig in. Hognose snakes have bad eyesight and no ears. They “hear” Read More

Five-holed Keyhole Urchin

Five-holed Keyhole Urchin

A living keyhole urchin is exposed on the beach at low tide. By Gerhard H Image Source Five-holed keyhole urchins, also called sand dollars, have very simple flat, round, bodies. On the top of a keyhole urchin’s body, five lines come together in a point to make a star-shaped pattern. Each keyhole urchin also has Read More

Five-Lined Skink

Five-Lined Skink

This adult five-lined skink has yellow and black stripes on its body and a faded blue tail. By Patrick Coin Image Source When a five-lined skink hatches from its egg, it comes out with a black and yellow-striped body and a flashy blue tail. The bright color of the skink’s tail might attract the attention Read More

Giant Brain Coral

Giant Brain Coral

This is one colony of giant brain coral living underwater. The ridges in the colony look brown, while the valleys look green. By Nick Hobgood Image Source Giant brain corals are animals with soft tube-shaped bodies that live together in large groups. Individual giant brain corals, called polyps, attach themselves to the ground and then Read More